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 Challenge Yourself! Join the Speech and Debate Team!  
Picture is of our Sweeps Bowl for 2014
"Northern Nevada Forensic League Small School Sweepstakes 3rd Place"
Small schools are 20 students or less competing we had six individuals competing
   
   
NNHS SPEECH AND DEBATE TEAM RANKINGS   
National Ranking: 1122 of 7834 
                                                       27 of 79
 8 of 19
2013 we had one student go to Nationals
 
       
 
There are 19 local schools from Fernley, Fallon, Reno, Sparks, Carson, Minden, Elko, Spring Creek and the NNHS (Home School Team) competing at the Northern Nevada Forensic League Tournaments. Around 350 kids competing at any given tournament. Our team is made up of homeschoolers from Carson City, Dayton, Minden, Reno and Sparks. 
 
Unlike public schools we are not provided with any public funds. We are always looking for donations to support our team. We belong to a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. Please click the donate button on this page to the left (in the Green) and specify in the comment section for the funds to go to Speech and Debate. The donate form links to PayPal. 
 
 
 
Team members compete and earn membership in a National Speech and Debate Association (FKA: NFL), a nationally recognized honor society. You will have the opportunity (but not the obligation) to compete against 19 area schools approximately once a month. Speech events include Dramatic Interpretation, Humorous Interpretation, Original Oratory, Impromptu, Extemporaneous, Duo Interpretation and more. Debate events include debating solo, in teams, or as part of a Student Congress. Intimidated by speaking in front of large groups? No problem! The average number of people in a room during competition is 6. Having trouble memorizing? Try Poetry/Prose Interpretation, where you will read out of a folder or try Impromptu or Extemporaneous events where you will draw your topic from an envelope and prepare on the spot. Overwhelmed by the thought of preparing a debate case or have such strong feelings on a subject that you wish to promote your side. Try Congress, where you will be discussing legislation proposed by students. Members will have the opportunity to win trophies, earn an academic letter for a letterman's jacket, meet other students, and earn membership in a prestigious organization. All members must be 14 as of September 30 of the school year you are competing in. as per Washoe County School District.  
 
On site training to those who have never judged before. All judges are provided with food and drink (i.e. soda, water, coffee). Friday begins about 2:30 pm. Saturday begins at 8:00 am. Don't feel you have to volunteer all day. You only need to be there 3-4 hours. If you are 18 or older and graduated high school you can come and judge for us. Please feel free to email me at LRNBFRY@sbcglobal.net
   
It's not to late to join our team. There is no minimum number of tournaments to attend. You don't have to take our class at Impact to compete on our team.
 
Contact us to find out more info               
                       
NFL has changed it's name to National Speech and Debate Association www.speechanddebate.org/  
  

National Speech and Debate Association (NSDA) is a prestigious honor society and they are the largest interscholastic speech and debate organization serving high school, and collegiate students in the United States. The Association provides competitive speech and debate activities, high-quality resources, comprehensive training, scholarship opportunities, and advanced recognition to more than 130,000 students and coaches every year. For nearly 90 years, the National Speech & Debate Association has empowered more than 1.5 million members to become engaged citizens, skilled professionals, and honorable leaders in our society.        

 

        
The League we belong to is
Northern Nevada Forensics www.nn4n6.org/  
The Northern NV Forensics League is the umbrella for all National Forensics League events in Northern NV.     
               
Sharon and LaRena teach a Speech and Debate class on Wednesday's at Impact www.impactcoop.org/
You do not have to attend class to be on the team.  We do go over all the events in class.
 
Feel Free to Contact any one of our coaches Sharon, LaRena or Rachel with any questions
 
Panel A Events for Speech
 
Dramatic Interpretation (DI) Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. With a spotlight on character development and depth, this event focuses on the student’s ability to convey emotion through the use of a dramatic text. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance, and state the title and the author.
 
Extemporaneous Speaking- United States Topics (USX) Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to current events in the United States and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the Internet during preparation. Topics range from political matters to economic concerns to U.S. foreign policy. The speech is delivered from memory. 

Duo Interpretation (DUO) Two competitors team up to deliver a ten-minute performance of a published play or story. Using off-stage focus, competitors convey emotion and environment through a variety of performance techniques focusing on the relationships and interactions between the characters. No props or costumes are used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the students to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author         

 

Expository Speaking (Expos) A student composed speech which primary purpose is of an informative nature
in which the speaker describes, clarifies, explains, and/or defines an object, idea, concept or process.
 
Story Telling (STO) Retelling of a published tale, story, myth, anecdote, or legend
        
 
Panel B Events for Speech      
 
 
Humorous Interpretation (HI)  Using a play, short story, or other published work, students perform a selection of one or more portions of a piece up to ten minutes in length. Humorous Interpretation is designed to test a student’s comedic skills through script analysis, delivery, timing, and character development. Competitors may portray one or multiple characters. No props or costumes may be used. Performances can also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the title and the author.
 
 
Extemporaneous Speaking- Foreign Topics (FX) Students are presented with a choice of three questions related to international current events and, in 30 minutes, prepare a seven-minute speech answering the selected question. Students may consult articles and evidence they gather prior to the contest, but may not use the Internet during preparation. Topics range from country-specific issues to regional concerns to foreign policy. The speech is delivered from memory.
 
 
Poetry and Prose Interpretation (PPI) this can be a combination of Poetry/Prose or just Poetry or Prose. This one can be semi memorized and in a binder  
 
 
Original Oratory (OO) Students deliver a self-written, ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Limited in their ability to quote words directly, competitors craft an argument using evidence, logic, and emotional appeals. Topics range widely, and can be informative or persuasive in nature. The speech is delivered from memory.
 
 
Impromptu Speaking A speech presented randomly from three drawn choices. 1st round is a word. 
2nd Round is a phrase.  3rd Round is a current event.  You choose one and give a speech on it.  
 
DEBATE EVENTS    
 
 
Student Congress A simulation of the U.S. legislative process, students generate a series of bills and resolutions for debate in Congressional Debate. Debaters alternate delivering speeches for and against the topic in a group setting. An elected student serves as a presiding officer to ensure debate flows smoothly. Students are assessed on their research, argumentation, and delivery skills, as well as their knowledge and use of parliamentary procedure. Each school competing in this event draws up and submits legislation for a resolution or a bill for student congress to debate upon.
 
 
Lincoln Douglas Debate (LD) one on one debate. This is a value debate. Students must prepare Affirmative and Negative cases. Topics are chosen every 2 months. Students find out in rounds weather they are Aff or Con. Lincoln Douglas Debate centers on a proposition of value, which concerns itself with what ought to be instead of what is. Values are ideals held by individuals, societies, governments, etc. Neither side is permitted to offer a plan (a formalized, comprehensive proposal for implementation); rather, they should offer reasoning to support a general principle. Debaters may offer generalized, practical examples or solutions to illustrate how the general principle could guide decisions.
  
 
Public Forum Debate (PF) Teams of 2. This is a an evidence debate. Teams must prepare Affirmative and Negative cases. This is always a flip for sides. Public Forum is a team debate event that supports or rejects a position posed by the monthly resolution topic (announced at www.nflonline.org/Topics). The clash of ideas must be communicated in a manner persuasive to the non-specialist or “citizen judge”, i.e. a member of the American jury.  The debate should:  Display solid logic, lucid reasoning, and depth of analysis  Utilize evidence without being driven by it. Present a clash of ideas by countering/refuting arguments of the opposing team (rebuttal). Communicate ideas with clarity, organization, eloquence, and professional decorum. . The winning team selects either: " The side – Pro (for the resolution) or Con (against the resolution) – they will argue " The speaker order (begin the debate or give the last speech). The team that loses the toss will then decide their preference from the option not selected by the winner (i.e., if the winning team decides to speak last, then the losing team may decide which side they will argue). The debate, therefore may begin with the con side, arguing against the topic.
 
 
Policy Debate Teams of 2. This debate deals with policy change in the US federal government. The topic is year round. Policy debate focuses on the advocacy of a plan or policy action. The affirmative team should outline the harms in the current system or some sort of need. Then they should present a policy that would satisfy the need they have outlined. In addition the affirmative may discuss additional advantages to the policy.  The negative team may argue that the affirmative policy fails to meet the need they have outlined (i.e. the affirmative does not solve). The negative also has the option to present disadvantages to the policy (the policy may solve the problem, but it will create new problems).  Other ways do exist for structuring an affirmative case or negative strategy, but in the end the debate should focus on whether or not a particular policy is an appropriate course of action.    
 
Judging Info 
 
Information for Judging and Competing in Public Forum Debate (PF)
Information for Judging and Competing in Lincoln Douglas Debate (LD)
Information for Judging and Competing in Policy Debate
Information for Judging and Competing in A and B events
   
   

 
 
  
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